Issue II

B.B.P. Hosmillo

Editorial Note

 

“Can I touch you now, I wondered, can I hold you, can I give you the world?” Marie Ee imagines a character asking this in her short story Rasa Sayang. A question of tangibility. A question that puts the agent in a vulnerable position as such question, precisely as love, welcomes negation. No. Cannot. Impossible. What if there was no capacity to speak against love?

 

The cultural politics of love and loving is undoubtedly a reliable framework to understand body politics; how scientific and evolutionary knowledge systems penetrate the body and control its senses. In the case of subjects at the margins, this is more dramatic and almost always tragic. Queer Southeast Asia continues to reflect this, traversing through perspectives and borders all capable of advancing the flexibility of language and human senses.

 

In this issue, we feature Thomas David Chaves, a Filipino author who, in his poems, traces the body while it is awake being driven by desire in contexts detached from the Philippines. In his work, we encounter a travelling subject, susceptible to be named as a homeless speaker, or one whose body is homed temporarily in places where forgetting and erasure are parts of being present. While his work is itself a record of passing and meditative pain, his language overturns loneliness by deploying the act of desire as an important kind of document; that even a scar has its own gifts.

 

Desire comes with interrogation. When Chaves sees this according to introspection, Fajar Zakhri, in his poem, sees this according to that very world that depends so much and wrongly on default gender system. As Indonesia actively shuts othered desires down, the voice of Fajar Zakhri and other Indonesian writers we have yet to hear must be met with critical attention. In the poem of Fajar Zakhri, the speaker ends with not just a sentiment but an act of not going back to the site where the politics of life is negotiated; of disconnection. While this may register as cowardice, it could also represent the failure of citizenship in the world’s largest archipelago as well as the longstanding aspiration of queer Indonesians to be recognized as Indonesians and free.

 

 The second issue of Queer Southeast Asia is very small but not bereft of relevance and intellect. As a journal not yet with a long history of publication, this issue should count as a call to dream for collectivity. To take resistance as an active measure. To commit to libertory politics of literacy and being. To say “keep hunting me” to our desire as Marie Ee puts it.  To love. To trust in love, the freedom only it can grant. To trust in love again. And again.

________

Reference:

B.B.P. Hosmillo. ‘Editorial Note’. Queer Southeast Asia: a literary journal of transgressive art Vol. 1. no. 2, June 2017.

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Issue II

B.B.P. Hosmillo

Editorial Note

 

“Can I touch you now, I wondered, can I hold you, can I give you the world?” Marie Ee imagines a character asking this in her short story Rasa Sayang. A question of tangibility. A question that puts the agent in a vulnerable position as such question, precisely as love, welcomes negation. No. Cannot. Impossible. What if there was no capacity to speak against love?

 

The cultural politics of love and loving is undoubtedly a reliable framework to understand body politics; how scientific and evolutionary knowledge systems penetrate the body and control its senses. In the case of subjects at the margins, this is more dramatic and almost always tragic. Queer Southeast Asia continues to reflect this, traversing through perspectives and borders all capable of advancing the flexibility of language and human senses.

 

In this issue, we feature Thomas David Chaves, a Filipino author who, in his poems, traces the body while it is awake being driven by desire in contexts detached from the Philippines. In his work, we encounter a travelling subject, susceptible to be named as a homeless speaker, or one whose body is homed temporarily in places where forgetting and erasure are parts of being present. While his work is itself a record of passing and meditative pain, his language overturns loneliness by deploying the act of desire as an important kind of document; that even a scar has its own gifts.

 

Desire comes with interrogation. When Chaves sees this according to introspection, Fajar Zakhri, in his poem, sees this according to that very world that depends so much and wrongly on default gender system. As Indonesia actively shuts othered desires down, the voice of Fajar Zakhri and other Indonesian writers we have yet to hear must be met with critical attention. In the poem of Fajar Zakhri, the speaker ends with not just a sentiment but an act of not going back to the site where the politics of life is negotiated; of disconnection. While this may register as cowardice, it could also represent the failure of citizenship in the world’s largest archipelago as well as the longstanding aspiration of queer Indonesians to be recognized as Indonesians and free.

 

 The second issue of Queer Southeast Asia is very small but not bereft of relevance and intellect. As a journal not yet with a long history of publication, this issue should count as a call to dream for collectivity. To take resistance as an active measure. To commit to libertory politics of literacy and being. To say “keep hunting me” to our desire as Marie Ee puts it.  To love. To trust in love, the freedom only it can grant. To trust in love again. And again.

________

Reference:

B.B.P. Hosmillo. ‘Editorial Note’. Queer Southeast Asia: a literary journal of transgressive art Vol. 1. no. 2, June 2017.

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Follow by Email
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http://queersoutheastasia.com/editorial-note-b-b-p-hosmillo-issue-2
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